Sic Transit Gloria Autumni

Two weeks ago I posted photos of one of the most beautiful autumns I can remember.

And now it’s almost over.

However, this year I have lots of writing plans for the coming three seasons (Nearly Winter, Winter, Mud), so for a change I’m actually looking forward to the cold, gray days of leafless trees and no outside chores except the traditional Wisconsin upper-body exercise of bend, scoop, lift, and toss.

© 2010 Anne Bingham and Making It Up as I Go

This entry was posted in Notes from the Neighborhood, Seasonal, The Writing Life and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Sic Transit Gloria Autumni

  1. Anne M Leone says:

    It’s been getting darker earlier and earlier in the morning. But strangely, like you, I’ve been finding I don’t mind. Project Demo is quite dark, so somehow sitting in a dark, quiet room seems fitting. I’m sure I’ll be sick of it in a few months, though. =)

    Like

    • Anne Bingham says:

      What’s the official sunrise/sunset where you are, Anne? We’re still on daylight saving time for another 10 days, so as of today, sunrise is 7:20 a.m. and sunset is 5:50. I miss those twilight walks after supper!

      Like

      • Anne M Leone says:

        Pretty similar here, Anne. Sunrise is 7:56, sunset is 5:51. We turn back the clocks this weekend!

        Like

        • Anne Bingham says:

          Wow, your sunrise is over half an hour later…And I bet it keeps just getting worse! But then you make up for it in June, don’t you?

          Like

          • Anne M Leone says:

            We make up for it in June AND THEN SOME! Actually, it sounds awful, but summer here drives me a bit nuts. It’s light when I fall asleep, light when I get up, and even light when I wake up in the middle of the night. I have to wear an eye mask to get a good night’s rest! Okay, going to stop whining about summer now–I think it makes the winter gods vengeful. =)

            Like

            • Anne Bingham says:

              When Younger Son was enjoying his semester abroad at Lancaster U, he was able to stay until the first week of June, and marveled at the bright evenings even then. I can’t imagine what it’s like around midsummer! His experience made me realize why “Midsummer” is such a big deal in English literature. Where I live, June is usually fairly cool. I guess you know that, being from the Big Windy and all, but I think we’re even cooler because of being 100 miles north and not having nearly the mass of glass and concrete to heat things up; I once wore my parka on July 4! When it’s hot enough to wake up the cicadas, that’s Midsummer as far as I’m concerned.

              Like

  2. I’m like a pinball when it comes to my WIP. There are two I’ve been toying with. One I know isn’t going to work right now—too bland, not marketable. The other one scares the you-know-what out of me because it’s a difficult/serious topic. It kind of pushes the envelope. But I keep thinking about it. Now you’ve inched the door open here and have me thinking how a long, dreary winter might be just the thing to work on this. Hmm…

    Like

    • Anne Bingham says:

      Does it have to be one or the other? Maybe there’s a third thing you could work on (not knitting!) while the scary one percolates. Or…I just had this idea: tell yourself you don’t have to work on the scary thing until you’ve knitted it a pair of lovely socks. Then give the socks away in a blog contest.

      Like

      • I think pretty much so at this point because I really want to dig deep into one project (and dig deeply, as well) instead of dipping into several. And this WIP about a girl who has lost her leg in an accident and has to find her way beyond that will. not. leave. me. alone. no matter how much I push her aside. (And believe me, I’ve pushed.) Can I do it? Who knows. But I have to try and see what happens–to her, and to me. I have to at least get a decent first draft done. And said long, dreary winter seems perfect. I accept virtual Snickers as assistance in this endeavor.

        And no, there will not be sock give-aways. *chuckle*

        Like

  3. MaryWitzl says:

    Okay, those piles of leaves don’t make me feel so bad about mine. We’ve got so many leaves that I can rake them up in the morning and in the afternoon, you’d swear I’d never been out there. I’ll be doing fine for leaf mold for the next five years or so.

    Now I’m dying to find out about what Andrea is thinking of writing, so I’ll have to go over to her blog… So many wonderful ways to procrastinate!

    Like

    • Anne Bingham says:

      The leaves in the photo had been pushed in place by city trucks, so each pile represents about half a block’s worth. They were picked up by the city on Monday, I think. Good thing; we had a serious windstorm this week (the weather folks are calling it a Category 1 hurricane), with two days of gusts up to 60 mph. I went to the grocery on Wednesday and had the experience of watching a smaller pile of leaves smoothly glide from the south curb to the north curb. Thank heavens the wind occurred when most of the leaves were down and there was that much less resistance; if The Great Midwestern Hurricane of 2010 had occurred a month earlier, we probably would have lost some major branches.

      Like

  4. Karin says:

    I spend a few fall weeks as a child in Minnesota and several more in Wisconsin (let’s not forget the HOT summer times I spent there too!)…but I can say that I miss those wonderfully colorful fall leaves. Living in Phoenix, I really do not miss anything, but two things, the beach and the colors of fall. If they sold fake maple trees I would put them in my front yard, regardless of how ridiculous they looked!
    Your photos are wonderful, even the sadness of the current one.
    All I can say is…I sure hope y’all found kids to rake those leaves into piles…it’s a lot of work 😉

    Like

    • Anne Bingham says:

      These are neighborhood piles, Karin, about half a block’s worth. The garbage trucks come with their snowplow attachments and push them into piles, and then after a day or so of slalom driving, the front loaders come and load them into garbage trucks. The leaf rake-out season lasts from about Ocober 15 through Nov. 15 but there are always some Norway maples that Just. Won’t. Surrender.

      Like

      • Karin says:

        Well that beats the kids having to do it! I did make some good money raking back in the day 🙂

        Like

        • Anne Bingham says:

          Anybody who’s home helps rake it from the yard to the street — and we have a LOT of trees, our own and leaves that blow into the yard from trees on other properties. It’s just that the huge piles in the photos are the result of the city pushing everybody’s leaves to central locations in the block for more efficient pick-up!

          Like

  5. I’m still waiting for Fall. We had two nice autumn weeks in October. The temps went back to the 80’s and 90’s but last night a cold front came in bringing rain. Tomorrow we may get to stay in the sixties all day. The first frost has not come, so the leaves are still green and the grass is actually growing. I’ll probably rake leaves in January. AACCK! I’m so jealous of you guys! Keep the pics coming for Karin and me 🙂

    Like

    • Anne Bingham says:

      Thanks for the encouragement about the photos, Catherine! I’m trying to think what I can shoot for November besides a frozen birdbath (we do have a heated one, but so much has been going on around here that I haven’t put it out yet).

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s